Wise Wealth Advisors

D.Muthukrishnan (Muthu), Certified Financial Planner- Personal Financial Advisor

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Archive for the ‘Stock Market’ Category

How a teacher couple turned $50,000 to $800 million?

Posted by Muthu on May 7, 2018

However rare the occurrence may be, we are able to connect well with real life examples. These examples motivate us to work towards financial independence and create sizeable wealth.

Donald and Mildred Othmer was born in the first decade of last century and lived well into their nineties before passing away in the last decade of the same century.

Donald and Mildred Othmer both belonged to Omaha, where Warren Buffett has been living from his childhood.

Donald worked as a professor in a polytechnic. He had scores of patent to his name. He was a good teacher, researcher and consultant. Mildred worked as a teacher.

They knew Buffett’s family well and trusted in his investment ability.

In 1960’s, when Buffett was running an investment partnership, they invested each $25,000 into the same.

When Buffett closed the partnership and gave the option of either taking the corpus back or converting into Berkshire Hathaway stock, they opted for latter. They got around 14,500 shares at $42 a share. This implies Buffett partnership has multiplied their wealth by over 12 times in a decade.

At the time of their passing away, the $50,000 investment has become whopping $800 million.

The couple did not have children and passed on their wealth to charitable causes.

Donald’s bequest of $190 million to the polytechnic where he worked for nearly 6 decades was about four times the institute’s entire endowment there by lifting the institute to a different league.

Donald and Mildred also provided well for Long Island College hospital in Brooklyn and University of Nebraska-Lincoln, from where both of them graduated.

They also contributed for other causes.

Their example again reinforces the need for buying right, sitting tight and staying the course. They held on to their investments for close to four decades without interrupting the compounding.

Had they not known Buffett and instead invested the same capital in index, it would have still become few million dollars.

As on date, had that $50,000 investment continued in Berkshire, it would be worth more than $4 billion.

Be it index or actively managed funds or portfolio of quality companies what is important is not to get swayed by short term movements, hold for long term and staying the course with patience and discipline.

In my view, we don’t need much brain to make money in a high growth economy with a long run way like India. What is required is capital, which needs to be created out of employment or business or profession, investing the same prudently and then simply staying the course.

Stay the course for next one to two decades and see the results

Posted in Stock Market, Warren Buffett, Wealth | 2 Comments »

How to think about investments?

Posted by Muthu on May 6, 2018

At times, for few weeks or months, I don’t get any ideas to write. It’s close to a month since I’ve written to you. Request you to bear with me during such dry spells.

Yesterday was the annual meeting of Berkshire Hathaway. Adam Blum has transcribed notes from the meeting. I found the Buffett’s introductory speech to be very good. Investment perspective makes all the difference in wealth creation. Read and follow what Buffett says below. Then it would be very difficult not to succeed.

“Here’s some personal history, with The New York Times front pages from March 10-12, 1942. You can see I’m a little behind on my reading. This was three months after we got involved in World War II, and we were losing, and headlines were full of bad news about the Pacific. The price of the newspaper was 3 cents, incidentally.

On March 10, the stock market was reflecting this news. And I’d been watching City Service preferred stock for a while. It was $84 a share the previous year and $55 a share at the beginning of 1942, and then in March it was down to $40 a share. On the 11th, I told my dad I wanted to buy three shares. That was all the money I had at the time – I was only eleven years old. So he bought the shares for me.

On the next day, the stock market was down 2.28% and broke 100 on downside, which is the equivalent of a 500-point drop. I was in school wondering what was going on. My dad had bought me the stock at $38.25, which was the high for day, and it was down to $37 by the end of day. Even though the war looked bad until the Battle of Midway, the stock did well and was called for over $200 a share by City Service. But I’d sold at $40 for $5.25 gain after watching it go down to $27. What’s the point? Imagine myself on March 11, 1942. Things were looking bad, but everyone knew we’d win the war, and the system had been working well since 1776.

Investing $10,000 in an index fund in 1942 to own a piece of American business would now be worth $51 million, and you wouldn’t have had to do anything. You wouldn’t have had to understand accounting or look at quotations. All you had to do was figure that America would do well over time, and American business would in turn do well and overcome difficulties. You didn’t have to pick out winning stocks or know when to buy or sell. The overriding question is, ‘how is American business going to do over your investing lifetime?’ If you had taken $10,000 and listened to the prophets of doom and gloom and bought 300 ounces of gold instead, today that still would be 300 ounces of gold.

You could go down to the safety deposit box and look at it and fondle it, and it wouldn’t produce anything. That gold would be worth $400,000 today. If you’d decided to go with a non productive asset versus a productive one, it is one hundred times the value difference. Every dollar earned in investing in the American business was matched by less than a penny gained by investing in a ‘store of value’ like gold over the same period.

We have the greatest tailwind you could ever imagine in this country. There’s no comparison trying to jump in and out of stocks and pay investment advisors and invest in non productive assets. If everyone had just bought in, your friendly stock broker would’ve starved to death, and you could’ve gone to his funeral to atone for it. You do not have to know about accounting and terminology and what the Fed is doing. It’s about a philosophy and forgetting what you don’t know how to do.

Posted in Stock Market, Warren Buffett, Wealth | 1 Comment »

The path is never smooth

Posted by Muthu on March 5, 2018

If someone has invested 53 years ago in Warren Buffett’s company, Berkshire Hathaway, he would have made a return of 2,404,748%. Yes, you read it right. We all know about the huge wealth creation by Buffett.

Stock markets would always be volatile. At the cost of repetition, 10% correction once a year, 20% fall once in few years and 30% fall once a decade is very normal. Don’t panic. This is how markets work.

During the journey of last 53 years, though the company was growing leaps and bounds, Berkshire share price had suffered four major falls.

Between March 1973 to January 1975, it fell by 59.1%

In a single month, in October 1987, it fell by 37.1%

Between June 1998 and March 2000, it fell by 48.9%

During the global recession, between September 2008 to March 2009, it fell by 50.7%

Though huge wealth was created by anyone who invested in Berkshire, the above four falls would have been gut-wrenching. There would have been many more 10%+ kind of corrections as well. There is no way to create wealth through equities without going through such roller coaster ride.

Though Indian markets provide us opportunity to create huge wealth through next two decades, the journey would not be without pain. Only those who can withstand the pain will enjoy huge gains.

Always keep in mind; the journey would be very rewarding but the path is never smooth.

Posted in Stock Market, Warren Buffett, Wealth | 1 Comment »

Points to remember

Posted by Muthu on February 8, 2018

1) Equity beats inflation and provides superior return over other asset classes in the long run.

2) Good years are more than bad years. Based on the past we can say 70% of the time it is good years.

3) Not possible to time the market. Need to stay invested through both good and bad years to reap the long term return.

4) 10% correction once a year is a normal. Should not be surprised whenever it occurs. Only non occurrence should be a surprise.

5) 20% correction once in few years and 30% fall once in a decade is also very normal. Need to live through this roller coaster ride to enjoy high returns which equities offer.

6) Better to avoid checking portfolio during the periods of market turbulence. Once a year review is good enough, more so during bear markets.

7) Need to withstand emotional pain during the corrections and falls. Any adverse reaction to emotional pain would convert temporary notional loss into permanent real loss.

8) Invest when you’ve money. Redeem when you need money. Ensure there is not less than 10 year time gap between both.

9) Have strong filters when you consume market news. If it is not possible, you would be better off ignoring such news and updates.

10) Patience, discipline and staying the course would ensure you reach your goals and become wealthy. Always work on developing these traits.

Posted in General, Muthu's Musings, Stock Market | 4 Comments »

Pain is inevitable

Posted by Muthu on February 6, 2018

We’ve always told you that 10% corrections once a year, 20% fall once in few years and 30% fall once in a decade is very common. There is no way to avoid the same. The 15% expected returns from equity over a decade includes the periods of high returns, low returns, no returns and negative returns.

Globally markets have been falling for last one week. Looks like India would not be immune to this in the short term. In the short run, markets are affected by so many factors. In the long run, it is the earnings and earnings alone which matters.

All our regular sharing and mentoring is to help you face periods of negative returns. Pain is inevitable in the roller coaster ride of stock markets. If we can understand that this pain is part and parcel of journey towards superior returns, we would suffer less.

Nobody would happy to see their portfolio going down by 20%. At the same time need to remember that these are notional losses. We should not make it a permanent loss by selling in panic.

Though I’ve no ability to predict markets, looks like near term may be bad. It would be better if you can avoid looking at your portfolio during such turbulent times. Corporate earnings have started picking up well from last quarter, and the businesses are expected to do well in future. If businesses do well, earnings go up and the same gets reflected in stock prices.

When the market falls, the business does not fall. Colgate would not sell lesser toothpastes due to fall in stock prices. Focusing on business instead of stock price is always a good thing, more so in bear markets.

It is in these times, we need to keep in mind the bigger picture. Good Indian companies have long run way of growth ahead of them which would create tremendous wealth for shareholders. To earn this wealth, we need to go through periods of pain, such as what is happening now.

No pain no gain is definitely true for wealth creation through equities.

Brace yourself to face short term pain for long term gains.

Posted in Stock Market, Wealth | 2 Comments »